Nonfiction Review: Love Wins

Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever LivedLove Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived by Rob Bell

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
I read this at a time when I was having a struggle with organized religion. My faith and the so-called “Christian values” did not seem to align. I was increasingly troubled by the incongruent philosophies espoused by the religious right (e.g. pro-war, anti-climate change, ultra-capitalistic rhetoric). Love Wins is an eye-opening, if not downright shocking, reframing of what heaven and hell might be.

Best take away for me is that God is a constant redeemer, making it possible for you to be forgiven and forgiven without end. We sometimes choose to live in a hell of our own making because we run from the grace He extends. Another takeaway: If we are too focused on the the after-life, we may actually miss out on one of God’s best gifts.

“Often times when I meet atheists and we talk about the god they don’t believe in, we quickly discover that I don’t believe in that god either.”

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teaching my kids not to be thankful for jesus’ death

the gruesome and brutal death of an innocent man is something we’d never dream to talk about with or show our children beyond the context of religion. it’s unthinkable that we’d wear an electric chair around our neck or use that as an emblem of our faith, but that’s exactly what we’ve reduced the cross to. we’ve made it not only palatable, but of no visceral consequence. those gruesome realities have been neutered in our christian culture and reduced to clichés that we teach children who have no capacity to understand those things.

teaching my kids not to be thankful for jesus’ death

‘Snow Fall’ and Storytelling in Higher Ed

In the six days following its launch, “Snow Fall” received more than 3.5 million pageviews and 2.9 million visitors—nearly a third of whom were new visitors to nytimes.com, according to a New York Times memo.

What made “Snow Fall” both so successful and so widely lauded? The feature marked a big step forward in the evolution of online storytelling. From the earliest stages of developing “Snow Fall,” writers, researchers, designers, developers and multimedia experts all worked together to craft a compelling narrative wreathed in a natural user experience.

So, another day, another online journalism innovation. What does it mean for us and our higher ed newsrooms? Our resources pale in comparison to the Times’—after all, “Snow Fall” took six months and nearly a dozen staffers to bring to life. What does this latest notch in the Gray Lady’s belt mean for higher ed?

‘Snow Fall’ and Storytelling in Higher Ed

Why thinking like a journalist can bring out the best content

A good story needs to be published as quickly as possible or risks losing its appeal.

The same rule applies for content marketing: it needs to be relevant and current, or the reader will move on to something else.

One of the easiest ways to come up with ideas is to take a look at current events and holidays. Christmas or Valentine’s Day coming up? Using these events and linking them with your business can be a unique way to connect with your customers.

The closer the better

Proximity is another crucial factor: if ten people are killed in a bus accident in the centre of your hometown, your local newspaper will undoubtedly consider it front page news. But if 30 people are killed in a bus accident in Tokmok in Kyrgyzstan, it will probably pass unnoticed. It’s essential to know who your audience is and what matters to them.

Why thinking like a journalist can bring out the best content

Why Every Content Marketer Should Have Newsroom Experience

Great stories don’t just happen. All great stories begin with a great idea.

Re. Typical Day in the Newsroom

An editor hands the reporter a simple assignment. The journalist’s job is to transform the topic into a juicy story with useful information and striking quotes. So, before any words are written, the journalist must brainstorm.

A journalist is trained to see a single idea from every possible angle.

Why Every Content Marketer Should Have Newsroom Experience